Review: Halo by Alexandra Adornetto


Warning: extreme rant. Approach with caution. It also has a spoiler.

Oh, Halo.

Because I don’t think I’ll be capable of positive thinking after this, I should add that I did enjoy the writing in this book and that I really admire Adornetto for becoming a published author at the age of 14 (she published The Shadow Thief).

And now onto the negatives.

I am writing a book review on Good Friday and I would like to mention that no matter whether you regard angels as mythical beings or not, angels are regarded as powerful, good, pure messengers of God. Actually, they’re that way unless you’re a YA author. The rules bend for you because you MUST accommodate that HAWT boy in your book!

The reason why I picked this book up was that of the overwhelmingly bad reviews on Goodreads. If you go and check it out, the whole first page is chock full of hilariously bad reviews, complete with stress-reduction kits and all (bang your head against a flat surface until you are concussed! Your stress will then be reduced!). And I was super excited to find this book in the library because I thought it would be bad in a FUNNY way.

Nicole, learn your lesson. An overwhelming amount of bad reviews is never wrong. Never pick up this sort of book again.

Let’s start off with the location of this book and geography. Right now, I’m learning about the poverty line, population pyramids, that sort of thing. I’m learning about the overwhelming amount of people who don’t have shelter, who don’t have food, who don’t have access to basic healthcare, who don’t earn enough money to feed their families. Angels should go and improve lives of these people, right?

Wrong again, guys!

In this book, Gabriel, Ivy, and–yes, she is an angel, get this–Bethany go to a sleepy coastal town where the siblings stay in a mansion, eat truffles, send Bethany to high school, and generally have a great time! This is sidestepped by the fact that there is a glaringly obviously villain who arrives at Bethany’s school and then bad things happen.

After that, there’s a happy ending. ALL IS WELL.

So basically, this is what the main characters in this story do to help life on earth:

  • Ivy knits! And volunteers at an aged care facility! I do that with the Duke of Ed program at my school too! Yay! I’m just as good as an angel!
  • Gabriel teaches at a school and he’s moody. And, OMG, because he’s so cute heaps of girls are chasing after him.
  • Bethany goes to school and, let’s see…hmm, what does she do help people? Oh, yes, she falls in love with this guy and it’s totally okay even though she’s an angel because he’s, like, totally hawt and it’s so okay to love hot boys even if it’s against the laws of heaven because he’s, like, cute! She also occasionally snaps out of it and goes and volunteers at the aged care facility because, like, she needs to DO something, right?

There are just…so many problems with this book I can’t even begin to list them all. For one, the author fills up about the first half of the book (and I’m not even exaggerating here) with descriptions of le beautiful town and how great life is on earth. And then she spends the next quarter of the book building up to an achingly obvious conclusion. The fact that I could predict the ending the moment the villain entered the story didn’t help either.

There’s also the part where Bethany reveals that she’s an angel to her human boyfriend, the moment when Gabriel hands her a credit card so she can go shopping for prom (I might add here that Adornetto is Australian, and in Australia, we have no such thing as prom. It’s a SCHOOL DANCE or a SOCIAL), the part when she actually considers having sex with her human boyfriend. And while I’m at it, did I mention that she gets drunk and gets a hangover?

I could go on and on about this, but I think I’m going to stop here. Please don’t read this book, and if you do need to, borrow it from the library. It’s one of the books I can safely say I seriously disliked. One star.

This really wasn’t for me.